Citation for Chador

Citation styles are based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed., and the MLA Style Manual, 2nd Ed..

MLA

"Chador." In The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. Ed. John L. Esposito. Oxford Islamic Studies Online. Sep 23, 2020. <http://www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/article/opr/t125/e417>.

Chicago

"Chador." In The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. , edited by John L. Esposito. Oxford Islamic Studies Online, http://www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/article/opr/t125/e417 (accessed Sep 23, 2020).

Chador

Persian. Veil. Full-length garment covering a woman from head to foot, typically black in color. Not mandated by the Quran, although it symbolizes modest dress in Islamic culture. Historically worn by urban upper-class women for protection, honor, and distinction. Western feminists point to it as a symbol of backwardness and women's oppression and inferior status in Islamic societies. Westernized elites discarded it in favor of Western dress. Like the hijab, the chador has become popular among women in Islamist movements wishing to visibly identify themselves as Islamists and as an assertion of dignity and Islamic culture. Mandated in Saudi Arabia.

See also Hijab

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