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Displaying: rib - rig

  • Riba (Subject Entry)

    Interest or usurious interest. Quranic verses prohibit riba, a practice that doubled a debt if the borrower defaulted and redoubled it if the borrower ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Ribā (Subject Entry)

    See Interest . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Ribā (Subject Entry)

    See Interest . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World

  • Ribat (Subject Entry)

    Fort or stronghold. Initially founded by Muslims in non-Muslim areas, simultaneously fulfilling defensive and missionary purposes. Over time, their character changed and they became ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Ribāṭ (Subject Entry)

    Ribāṭ is a concept with a diverse history. The basic meaning of the root r-b-ṭ is “to bind.” Via the idea of “binding a ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics

  • Ribat-i Malik (Subject Entry)

    Caravanserai on the Malik steppe near Kermine in Uzbekistan. Built at the beginning of the 11th century to service the road between Bukhara and ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Ribat-i Sharaf (Subject Entry)

    Ruined building in northeast Iran on the road from Nishapur to Merv (now Mary, Turkmenistan). It was built as a caravanserai in 1114 – ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Rice, David Storm (Biography)

    ( b. Schönbrunn , 28 March 1913 ; d. London , 19 April 1962 ). British art historian of Austrian birth. In 1923 he ...

    Source: The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture

  • Rida, Ali al- (Biography)

    (d. 818 ) Eighth imam in the reckoning of the Twelver Shiis. The Abbasid caliph al-Mamun (d. 833 ) designated him as his successor ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Riḍā, Muḥammad Rashīd (Biography)

    Following a line of Muslim reformers, Rashīd Riḍā coupled the power of his own (and his mentors’) ideas with the emergent mass medium of ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

  • Riḋā, Rashīd (Biography)

    See Rashīd Riḋā , Muḥammad . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World

  • Riḍā, Rashīd (Subject Entry)

    See Rashīd Ridā, Muhammad . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Riddah (Subject Entry)

    See Apostasy . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Islam and Politics

  • Rif (Subject Entry)

    Coastal mountain region in northern Morocco extending from the Straits of Gibraltar to the mouth of the Moulouya River. Site of the Rif Rebellion ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Rifā῾īyah (Subject Entry)

    The Sunnī Ṣūfī order known as the Rifā῾īyah played an important role in the institutionalization of Sufism. In all likelihood, until the fifteenth century ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World

  • Rifai Tariqah (Subject Entry)

    Sunni Sufi order that played an important role in the institutionalization of Sufism; until the fifteenth century it was the most prevalent order. Ahmad ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Rifāʿīyah (Subject Entry)

    The Sunnī Ṣūfī order known as the Rifāʿīyah played an important role in the institutionalization of Sufism. In all likelihood, until the fifteenth century ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Rightly Guided Caliphs (Subject Entry)

    Sunnī Muslims see the first four successors of the Prophet as caliphs who were “rightly guided” or “following the right path,” al-khulafāʿ al-rāshidūn . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World

  • Rightly Guided Caliphs (Subject Entry)

    For Sunnis, the first four successors of Muhammad : Abu Bakr al-Siddiq , Umar ibn al-Khattab , Uthman ibn Affan , and Ali ibn ...

    Source: The Oxford Dictionary of Islam

  • Rightly Guided Caliphs (Subject Entry)

    Sunnī Muslims see the first four successors of the Prophet as caliphs who were “rightly guided” or “following the right path,” and refer to ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World

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