We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Tara - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Tara

Source:
The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture What is This? Provides in-depth historical and cultural information on over a thousand years of Islamic art and architecture

Tara

[Tara Kalan]

(fl. c.1560–1600).

Indian miniature painter. His work conformed to the conventions of the period of patronage of the emperor Akbar (r. 1556–1605; see Mughal, §II, C), when Tara contributed to at least six manuscripts. His work is characterized by a love of bright primary colors and a lively sense of movement and realism. His figures often have ample, unruly mustaches and beards, large glaring eyes, and bared teeth. By 1590 his work shows an experienced hand and a firm handling of the brush, with a clear grasp of the techniques of stippling and feathered shading. Possibly a Hindu, Tara appears fairly low on the list of 17 prized artists compiled by Abu῾l-Fazl, Akbar's court biographer, in the Āyīn-i Akbarī. In a detailed study of the Tūtīnāma (“Tales of a parrot”; c.1560–70; Cleveland, OH, Mus. A., MS. 62.279), two folios are assigned to this artist. On the basis of this ascription, he has seems to have worked on the figures in several paintings in the dispersed Hamzanāma (“Book of Hamza”; 1557–77). This would place Tara on the level of the more senior artists in the workshop in the early years of Akbar's patronage.

Tara's name appears in the Razmnāma (“Book of wars”; c.1582–6; Jaipur, Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II Mus.), where Tara had sole responsibility for fols. 37 and 56 and acted as a designer in fol. 135, collaborating with Tulsi Khurd (“the younger”). Tara also was the colorist for Daswanth in three folios of this manuscript. In the Tīmūrnāma (“History of Timur”; 1584; Bankipur, Patna, Khuda Bakhsh Lib.) he acted as painter/colorist for Basawan. Tara's hand is visible in fol. 130b in the Khamsa (“Five poems”) of Nizami (c.1585; Ham, Surrey, Keir priv. col.), where he had sole responsibility; in fol. 182v he collaborated with Kesu Khurd (“the younger”). One folio is assigned to Tara in the Dārābnāma (“Story of Darab”; c.1583–6; London, BL, Or 4615). In the first Akbarnāma (“History of Akbar”; c.1587–90; London, V&A, MS. IS.2:1896) he was assigned fols. 17 and 61 as a painter/colorist; in both he worked for Basawan (for illustration see Basawan).

Bibliography

  • P. Chandra: The Tūtī-nāma of the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Origins of Mughal Painting (Graz, 1976)
  • The Imperial Image: Paintings for the Mughal Court (exh. cat. by M. C. Beach; Washington, DC, Freer, 1981)
  • The Adventures of Hamza (exh. cat. by J. Seyller; Washington, DC, Sackler Gal.; New York, Brooklyn Mus.; London, RA; Zurich, Mus. Rietberg; 2002–3), pp. 244–53
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice