We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Abduh, Muhammad - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Abduh, Muhammad

Source:
The Islamic World: Past and Present What is This? Accessible coverage of Islam from the seventh century to the twenty-first century

    Abduh, Muhammad

    1849 – 1905 Egyptian

    scholar,

    reformer

    Many scholars consider Muhammad Abduh the architect of Islamic modernism. His early years included a traditional education and a commitment to Sufism. As a young adult, Abduh became a disciple of Jamal al-Din al-Afghani and an activist for the Pan-Islamic movement. Al-Afghani hoped to unite Muslims in opposition to European colonizers. The British exiled both men from Egypt in 1882 for their part in a failed nationalist revolt.

    Abduh returned to Egypt six years later. He focused his energies on religious, social, and educational reforms. Abduh perceived that Islam was in decline. He believed passivity and a rigid adherence to tradition had weakened the religion by holding it to outdated practices.

    Abduh based his reform agenda on the idea that religion and science were compatible. He believed both were sources of truth and should strengthen one's belief in God. Abduh further sought to ground Islam in reason, rejecting a belief in superstition and blind traditionalism. He expressed many of his theories in The Theology of Unity, his most popular book.

    Believing in the harmony between reason and revelation, Abduh advocated legal and theological reform. He called for universal education and modernized the program of study at al-Azhar, the Islamic mosque-university in Egypt. He also encouraged strengthening family life by ending polygyny and divorce. Strong opposition in the legal and academic communities, however, slowed the progress of Abduh's reforms. Nonetheless, Abduh left a lasting legacy. His ideas about a modern Islam influenced thinkers throughout the twentieth century. See also Afghani, Jamal al-Din al-; Modernism; Science.

    • Previous Result
    • Results
    • Highlight On / Off
    • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
    • Next Result
    Oxford University Press

    © 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice