We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Malik ibn Anas - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Malik ibn Anas

Source:
The Islamic World: Past and Present What is This? Accessible coverage of Islam from the seventh century to the twenty-first century

    Related Content

    Malik ibn Anas

    ca. 713– 795 Founder of school of Islamic law

    Malik ibn Anas, a scholar in Medina, specialized in Muslim law. His teachings became the basis for one of the four main Sunni schools of Islamic jurisprudence—the Maliki school.

    Born in Medina around 713 , Malik ibn Anas spent his entire life in that city, traveling only to Mecca to fulfill his hajj obligation. In Medina, he studied with the city's leading teachers of jurisprudence and devoted his own life to learning and teaching. He became an expert on the hadith, and was known for giving judgments that were conscientious and fair. Many scholars attended the lectures that he gave at the Prophet's mosque. Malik believed that the faithful in Medina adhered most closely to the original teachings of Muhammad. Among his writings was a compilation of the religious and legal customs of Medina, which he published in a book titled al-Mutawatta (The Beaten Path). The first book of its kind, al-Mutawatta became a foundation of Muslim legal practices.

    Some legal scholars, however, disagreed with Malik ibn Anas, and in time, four distinct schools of legal thought emerged. The Hanafi school, which became the most widespread, followed relatively liberal methods of legal interpretation. The Maliki school was distinguished by its reliance on the traditions of Medina. The Shafi'i school combined elements from Hanafi and Maliki teachings but placed more emphasis on the practice of the Prophet Muhammad than on establishing new applications of Islamic principles. The Hanbali school, which placed great importance on tradition, became the basis of Wahhabi Islam in Saudi Arabia. The Maliki madhhab (schools of legal thought) became prominent in Medina, Egypt, and North Africa.

    Although the Maliki school was considered conservative, its followers actively debated controversial issues such as free will and predestination. In addition to law, Maliki scholars also studied grammar, linguistics, mathematics, astronomy, and medicine. Maliki instruction and study flourished especially in the cities of al-Qayrawan and Tunis in North Africa. See also Creed.

    • Previous Result
    • Results
    • Highlight On / Off
    • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
    • Next Result
    Oxford University Press

    © 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice