We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Bhutto, Benazir - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Bhutto, Benazir

By:
Syed Rifaat Hussain
Source:
The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World What is This? Provides comprehensive scholarly coverage of the full geographical and historical extent of Islam

Related Content

Bhutto, Benazir

Benazir Bhutto (1953–2007) was born in the port city of Karachi; she received her early education at elite English-language Pakistani schools. From 1969 to 1973 she attended Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts, then went on to Harvard University, where she obtained a degree in comparative government. From 1973 to 1977, she studied philosophy, politics, and economics at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, where she was elected president of the Oxford Union. Following the execution of her father, Zulifqar Ali Bhutto in April 1978 by the military regime of General Zia ul-Haq, Benazir Bhutto entered the political arena by assuming the leadership of the Pakistan People's Party (PPP) founded by her father in 1968. After spending many years in detention and living in exile, she returned to Pakistan in 1986. In 1987, she married Asif Ali Zardari, a wealthy fellow Sindhi with a dubious reputation for honesty. On December 2, 1988, she was sworn in as prime minister of Pakistan and became the first woman to head the government of an Islamic state. Her tenure as prime minister ended in 1990 when her government was dismissed on charges of corruption. She became prime minister again in 1993 and lost power in 1996 on similar grounds. After living in exile for over a decade, Benazir Bhutto returned to Pakistan in October 2007, and her homecoming rally in Karachi was marred by a suicide bomb attack that killed 150 people belonging to her party. Benazir Bhutto was assassinated on December 27, 2007, after leaving a PPP election rally in Rawalpindi. She is survived by her son Bilawal and two daughters, Bakhtawar and Aseefa. Benazir Bhutto received the Bruno Kerensky Award for Human Rights in 1988 and Honorary Beta Kappa Award from Radcliffe in 1989.

See also PAKISTAN.

Bibliography

  • Bhutto, Benazir. Daughter of the East. London: Hamilton, 1989.
  • Bhutto, Benazir. Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West. New York: HarperCollins, 2008.
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice