We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Arafat - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Arafat

By:
Mustafa Kabha
Source:
The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World What is This? Provides comprehensive scholarly coverage of the full geographical and historical extent of Islam

Related Content

Arafat

Arafat (Arafah) Mountain, is a mountain plain about 13 miles east of Mecca, on the road to Taif. The mountain is a granite hill that stands about 230 feet high. It is also known as Jabal al-Rahmah, (Mount of Mercy).

The site of Arafat is about 4 miles in breadth from east to west, and 7–8 miles in length. It lies outside the ḥaram (sanctuary) of Mecca. Pilgrims coming from Mecca emerge through a pass called Mʿazamayn, and pass the pillars which delimit the sanctuary. At the edge of the sanctuary is the Mosque of Namira. On top of the mountain there stood a dome (qubbah), called Qubbat Umm Salāmah (Dome of the Wife of the Prophet Muhammad), which was destroyed by the Wahhābīs in the beginning of the nineteenth century.

The precise origin of the name “Arafat” is unknown, but it may come from the Arabic ʿarafa, meaning “to recognize,” or taʿarrafa, meaning “to recognize each other.” The legendary explanation is that Adam and Eve separated after their expulsion from Paradise but met again at the spot and recognized each other.

During the annual hajj, pilgrims travel outside the city of Mecca to Mount Arafat to perform prayers. This is one of the first significant events of the fifth day of the ḥajj.

Mount Arafat is mentioned in the Qurʿān: “When you leave Arafat, remember Allāh at the holy place [assumed to be Muzdalifa]. Remember Him: He has guided you. Before that you were astray” (2:198). Mount Arafat is also mentioned several times in ḥadīth literature.

The Prophet Muḥammad visited Mount Arafat as a pilgrim only once, during which trip he gave the “farewell sermon.” According to tradition, there were some 140,000 fellow pilgrims that year.

This sermon is recited every year on the day of Arafat, the ninth day of Dhu al-Ḥijjah, from the same Hill of Mercy at Arafat. See also HAJJ and MECCA.

Bibliography

  • Armstrong, Karen. Islam: A Short History. New York: Random House, 2002.
  • Eickelman, Dale, and James Piscatori. Muslim Travellers: Pilgrimage, Migration, and the Religious Imagination. Berkeley, Calif., 1990.
  • The Encyclopedia of Islam. New edition.Volume 1, A–B.Leiden, 1986. See p. 604.
  • Nomani, M. Manzoor. Islamic Faith and Practice. Lucknow, India, 1973. See pp. 98–102.
  • www.hajinformation.com
  • www.aawsat.com
  • www.asiarooms.com
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2018. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice