We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more Day of Judgment - Oxford Islamic Studies Online
Select Translation What is This? Selections include: The Koran Interpreted, a translation by A.J. Arberry, first published 1955; The Qur'an, translated by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem, published 2004; or side-by-side comparison view
Chapter: verse lookup What is This? Select one or both translations, then enter a chapter and verse number in the boxes, and click "Go."
:
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Next Result

Day of Judgment

Source:
The Oxford Dictionary of Islam What is This? Covers the religious, political, and social spheres of global Islam in the modern world

    Related Content

    Read More About…

    Day of Judgment

    Muslims believe that at the end of time, all human beings will have to face God and account for their deeds, good and bad. God will judge them accordingly, assigning reward or punishment. The time of the Day of Judgment is not specified in the Quran but is understood to be near. Its depiction is similar to biblical accounts, with earthquakes, moving mountains, the sky splitting open, heaven being rolled back, the sun ceasing to shine, stars being scattered and falling upon the earth, oceans boiling over, graves opening, the earth bringing forth hidden sins as well as lost stories and the dead themselves, and people vainly trying to flee divine wrath. Everyone will bow before God. Traditional Islamic thought portrays the Day of Judgment as preceded by a cosmic battle between Satan's forces, represented by the false messiah al-Dajjal and Gog and Magog, and God's forces, led by the Mahdi and Jesus .

    See also Afterlife

    • Previous Result
    • Results
    • Highlight On / Off
    • Look It Up What is This? Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
    • Next Result
    Oxford University Press

    © 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice